August 31st, 2010

books

happy release day! (part I)

Today is the official publication day for:

C.E. Murphy's Truthseeker

Gifted with an uncanny intuition, Lara Jansen nonetheless thinks there is nothing particularly special about her. All that changes when a handsome but mysterious man enters her quiet Boston tailor shop and reveals himself to be a prince of Faerie. What’s more, Dafydd ap Caerwyn claims that Lara is a truthseeker, a person with the rare talent of being able to tell truth from falsehood. Dafydd begs Lara to help solve his brother’s murder, of which Dafydd himself is the only suspect.

"Truthseeker is pure C.E. Murphy at her best. Deftly switching between modern Boston and the alternate reality of the Barrow-lands, Truthseeker builds to an ending that will have you screaming for more."—Kim Harrison, author of the Hollows series




Jay Lake's The Sky that Wraps

Lake's sixth collection offers 25 tales written since 2007's The River Knows Its Own. The collection is bookended by popular favorites: the haunting "The American Dead" and "The Sky That Wraps the World Round, past the Blue and into the Black," a moody meditation on mistakes and the end of the universe. One of Lake's strengths is his ability to channel classic writers and styles, such as the heroic fantasy of Robert E. Howard in "The Leopard's Paw," Cordwainer Smith in the baroque "The Man with One Bright Eye," pulp SF in "Lehr, Rex," and space opera adventure in "To Raise a Mutiny Betwixt Yourselves." Fans of Lake's novels will especially appreciate the tie-ins to Green, Mainspring, and Trial of Flowers, while the diversity of settings and styles makes this a nice introduction to Lake's stylish craftsmanship. --Publishers Weekly




Elizabeth Bear's By the Mountain Bound now in mass market paperback.

"In this complex prequel to Hugo-winner Bear's All the Windwracked Stars (2008), Ragnarok has already occurred, but the world must still be cleansed of the residue of the former realm. When immortal einherjar war-leader Strifbjorn rescues a strange woman from drowning, she claims to be the Lady, a long-awaited deity, and defeats Strifbjorn's champion and lover, Mingan the Gray Wolf, to take command. The ensuing internal power struggles set the einherjar at odds while the Lady attempts to rally the community against a supposedly imminent attack by giants. Numerous fantasy authors adopt the tropes of Norse mythology, but Bear actively pursues them, channeling those myths directly rather than overlaying them on more familiar ones. The result demands much from readers, but repays it in vivid, sensual imagery of a wholly different world." --Publishers Weekly




P.C. Hodgell's Seeker's Bane also now in mass market paperback.

Two epic novels of fantasy adventure in one volume:

Seeker’s Mask: After an epic adventure that will become the stuff of legend, Jame has been reunited with her older brother Torisen and with her people, the Kencyrath. But when she is placed in the Women's Halls and expected to become a normal, quiet Kencyr lady, normal and quiet are not what the Women’s Halls are going to get. Shadow Guild Assassins, ghosts, and other strange beings are soon after her, sprung not only from her own adventurous past but from the tragic, mysterious events that nearly annihilated her family in her father’s time.

To Ride a Rathorn: Jame’s adventures continue as she arrives at the randon military college Tentir to face cut-throat competition and find even more buried, poisonous family secrets. The Kencyr have a phrase, “to ride a rathorn,” referring to a task too dangerous either to accomplish or to give up. This is true for Jame both figuratively, given her military career in a college which no Highborn girl has ever attended before, and literally, in that she is being stalked by one of these murderous, ivory-clad creatures whose mother she killed and who is now after her blood.
books

happy release day! (part II)

Mike Shevdon's Sixty-One Nails: Courts of the Feyre, Book 1 makes its U.S. debut today with The Road to Bedlam launching in the U.K. tomorrow (and coming to our shores in October).

There is a secret war raging beneath the streets of London. A dark magic will be unleashed by the Untainted… unless a new hero can be found. Sixty-One Nails follows Niall Petersen, from a suspected heart attack on the London Underground, into the hidden world of the Feyre, an uncanny place of legend that lurks just beyond the surface of everyday life. The Untainted, the darkest of the Seven Courts, have made their play for power, and unless Niall can recreate the ritual of the Sixty-One Nails, their dark dominion will enslave all of the Feyre, and all of humankind too.




Ken Scholes' Canticle, the 2nd book in the Psalms of Isaak, is out in mass market today.

The conspiracy deepens in this sequel to Scholes' epic, marvelously complex fantasy debut (Lamentation, 2009). In the previous installment, ancient spells of the Wizard King Xhum Y'Zir leveled the city of Windwir, repository of knowledge from the Old World. The instigator of the destruction, a Y'Zirite cult, reveals itself as the sequel opens by assassinating several major political figures, an act which the cult sees as the necessary prelude to the advent of its prophesied Crimson Empress. As civil war spreads across the Named Lands, nobleman schemer Vlad Li Tam and his extensive family search for the stronghold of their foe; the Gypsy King Rudolfo seeks a cure for his ailing infant son Jakob, heralded by Y'Zirites as the Child of Promise; Windwir survivor and prophetic dreamer Neb seeks his destiny in the Churning Wastes; and his beloved, the young Marsh Queen Winters, faces the unpleasant, deadly truth that the Y'Zirite cult sprang from her own people. Not only is Scholes a capable world builder, he ably handles the tough task of keeping the series momentum going, intensifying the mystery so deftly that even if readers can't foresee where the story's going, it's clear that the author knows exactly what he's doing. -- Kirkus, Starred Review

Also, a special e-book offer this month for the first book, Lamentation, for just $2.99 Kindle | Nook | Sony




Ekaterina Sedia's The Secret History of Moscow is now available in mass market as well.

Every city contains secret places. Moscow in the tumultuous 1990s is no different, its citizens seeking safety in a world below the streets - a dark, cavernous world of magic, weeping trees, and albino jackdaws, where exiled pagan deities and faery-tale creatures whisper strange tales to those who would listen. Galina is a young woman caught, like her contemporaries, in the seeming lawlessness of the new Russia. In the midst of this chaos, her sister Maria turns into a jackdaw and flies away - prompting Galina to join Yakov, a policeman investigating a rash of recent disappearances. Their search will take them to the underground realm of hidden truths and archetypes, to find themselves caught between reality and myth, past and present, honor and betrayal . . . the secret history of Moscow.

"The Secret History of Moscow is a truly remarkable performance, written in a consistently graceful and focused prose, and it succeeds both as a coherent fantasy novel and a meditation on the anxieties of history." --Gary K. Wolfe, Locus